4 Ways to Prepare for an In-Person Interview

interview preparednessYou’ve impressed your potential future employer with an impressive resume and job application. Now, you’re heading into an in-person interview, and it’s really time to sell yourself. This is a big step toward getting the new gig – and first impressions do go a long way. Here are some tips to prepare for the big interview.

  1. Do your homework.

It’s honestly rare today to interview a candidate who knows about the company at which they applied. Before walking into the interview, do your research! Peruse the company’s website, read the “About Us” page, and look up the interviewer on LinkedIn to know a little bit about their background. One added bonus to that is they’ll also see that you looked at their profile and are doing your homework.

  1. Be specific.

Anticipate what the interviewer might ask you – and prepare. When the interviewer asks you a question related to your experience, don’t just speak in generalities about your responsibilities. Ahead of the interview, make a mental list of specific actions you took in your previous positions to overcome problems, or achieve positive outcomes. Having numbers and data attached to these anecdotes will also help. And, brainstorming sessions like this will help you keep from stumbling during the actual interview.

  1. Dress Appropriately

You would be surprised how many people in today’s working world show up to interviews dressed inappropriately, especially in the world of construction. Remember, you can never overdress. Do not show up in your work clothes from a day on the job site. For construction-related positions, business casual or better is wise. And if you aren’t totally sure, don’t hesitate to ask the person who coordinated the interview with you! They will appreciate you making the effort to present yourself well, and meet their expectations!

Also – leave the perfume/cologne, gum, and phone in the car. Yes. I said your phone. It can wait until you’re through with the interview.

  1. Be yourself.

Be professional, but also be yourself. Most employers today try to hire people who will fit into their company’s culture, so they want to know the real you and the type of employee you are. It’s better to be authentic and honest, than put on a mask. The potential employer will likely see through the mask and be displeased, or not see through it, you’ll get hired, then once it turns out to not be a good fit, you’ll be back on the job hunt again.